A Pilot Study of Cystic Volume Reduction by Foam Sclerotherapy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

Tolvaptan is not able to address existing cyst burden in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

Capstone Summary:

ADPKD is the most common inherited kidney disorder worldwide with a prevalence between 1:400 and 1:1000. Patients eventually develop kidney failure and require dialysis. Tolvaptan is the only treatment approved in Canada. Tolvaptan reduces further growth of cysts but does not reduce the cyst burden.
Foam sclerotherapy is a novel treatment able to permanently shrink the size of cysts with minimal reported side effects. From 2014 to 2016, more than 60 patients underwent an experimental foam sclerotherapy procedure at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) with promising results!

ADPKD is the most common inherited kidney disorder worldwide with a prevalence between 1:400 and 1:1000. Patients eventually develop kidney failure and require dialysis. Tolvaptan is the only treatment approved in Canada. Tolvaptan reduces further growth of cysts but does not reduce the cyst burden.
Foam sclerotherapy is a novel treatment able to permanently shrink the size of cysts with minimal reported side effects. From 2014 to 2016, more than 60 patients underwent an experimental foam sclerotherapy procedure at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) with promising results!

Capstone Team: 

Dr. Ioan-Andrei Iliuta, MD MHScTR MD MHScTR

Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network
Hereditary Kidney Disease Fellow Hereditary Kidney Disease Fellow

 

Capstone Supervisor:

No items found

Capstone Advisory Committee:

Eran Shlomovitz, MD

Surgery - University of Toronto
Assistant Professor

York P-C Pei, MSc, MD, FRCPC

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute (TGHRI)
Senior Scientist

Anna Gagliardi, PhD

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute (TGHRI)
Senior Scientist

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