Increasing Access to Upper Limb Reconstruction for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

Capstone Summary:

Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event that results in upper limb paralysis, loss of independence, and disability. At an estimated lifetime cost of $3 million, cervical SCI places a substantial economic burden on the individual and the healthcare system. People living with cervical SCI have identified improvement of upper limb function as a top priority. Nerve and tendon transfer surgery has successfully restored upper limb function in cervical SCI, but is not universally used or available to all eligible individuals. The barriers preventing utilization of upper limb reconstruction are a complex interrelation of individual, healthcare provider and system level factors. Our exploratory qualitative study will use an implementation science approach to better understand these factors that influence access to upper limb reconstruction in the Canadian context and design an intervention to increase access to care.

Capstone Team: 

Dr. Jana Dengler, MD MASc BASc MD MASc BASc

Hand and Nerve Surgeon, Division of Plastic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto Hand and Nerve Surgeon, Division of Plastic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto

 

Ms. Michelle Jenette,


 

Ms. Maytal Perlman, BKI (Bachelor of Knowledge Integration, Speech Communication Minor, Collaborative Design Specialization) BKI (Bachelor of Knowledge Integration, Speech Communication Minor, Collaborative Design Specialization)


 

Capstone Supervisor:

No items found

Capstone Advisory Committee:

Ms. Edyta Marcon, MSc PhD MSc PhD MHSc

Senior Research Associate, Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto Senior Research Associate, Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto
Concept Translator Lecturer, TRP Concept Translator Lecturer, TRP

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 - Dr. Reza MD (Sick Kids Nuclear Medicine, Associate Professor UofT)