Ms. Saddaf Syed

OCT, PGCE, BSc (Hons)

University of Toronto

Practice Coordinator

Research Interests:

Clinical Trials- Psychology, Neurology, Human Performance, social determinants of health, access to care, insomnia, Biomedical Engineering- devices.

Brief Bio:

Saddaf Syed is a refined medical researcher with over 10 years of quantitative and qualitative research and project coordination experience. She has worked with U of T as a Research Project Coordinator and with not-for-profit organizations as a Program Coordinator. Her areas of expertise include protocol development, REB applications, recruitment, and quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. As a TRP graduate student, Saddaf has acquired an in-depth understanding of the processes along the research continuum. She has mastered knowledge in intellectual property, project management, leadership, professionalism, entrepreneurship, clinical trials, clinical investigator program, translational thinking, procurement (privacy and regulatory affairs), grant writing, and economics of health care. Her interests focus on maternal health, sleep studies, regenerative medicine, medical devices, and stroke in young adults.

Capstone Project:

1. Improve knowledge of primary stroke prevention for at-risk patients and
2. Enhance communication between FP and patients at-risk of stroke.

Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability worldwide. In Canada, 62,000 people are affected by stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA) each year. In Ontario alone, 17,500 patients were admitted in 2016-2017 for stroke or TIA. As a result of improved stroke survival rates, more than 400,000 Canadians are currently living with long-term disability from stroke, and this number will almost double in the next 20 years. Stroke can be prevented in patients with modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation. These conditions account for up to 90% of stroke risk. Management of these risk factors is an effective method for reducing stroke incidence and mortality.

Ms. Saddaf Syed

OCT, PGCE, BSc (Hons)

University of Toronto

Practice Coordinator

Research Interests:

Clinical Trials- Psychology, Neurology, Human Performance, social determinants of health, access to care, insomnia, Biomedical Engineering- devices.

Brief Bio:

Saddaf Syed is a refined medical researcher with over 10 years of quantitative and qualitative research and project coordination experience. She has worked with U of T as a Research Project Coordinator and with not-for-profit organizations as a Program Coordinator. Her areas of expertise include protocol development, REB applications, recruitment, and quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. As a TRP graduate student, Saddaf has acquired an in-depth understanding of the processes along the research continuum. She has mastered knowledge in intellectual property, project management, leadership, professionalism, entrepreneurship, clinical trials, clinical investigator program, translational thinking, procurement (privacy and regulatory affairs), grant writing, and economics of health care. Her interests focus on maternal health, sleep studies, regenerative medicine, medical devices, and stroke in young adults.

Capstone Project:

1. Improve knowledge of primary stroke prevention for at-risk patients and
2. Enhance communication between FP and patients at-risk of stroke.

Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability worldwide. In Canada, 62,000 people are affected by stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA) each year. In Ontario alone, 17,500 patients were admitted in 2016-2017 for stroke or TIA. As a result of improved stroke survival rates, more than 400,000 Canadians are currently living with long-term disability from stroke, and this number will almost double in the next 20 years. Stroke can be prevented in patients with modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation. These conditions account for up to 90% of stroke risk. Management of these risk factors is an effective method for reducing stroke incidence and mortality.