Allan Waters Family Simulation Centre

 

Yasman Mohammadzadeh
08/12/20

The centre provides simulated realistic learning opportunities to prepare students, allied health care professionals, researchers, physicians and surgeons for actual patient care situations that could occur in the emergency/trauma, operating room or inpatient ward environments. It is also an ideal resource for developing educational curriculum and research.

The centre provides simulated realistic learning opportunities to prepare students, allied health care professionals, researchers, physicians and surgeons for actual patient care situations that could occur in the emergency/trauma, operating room or inpatient ward environments. It is also an ideal resource for developing educational curriculum and research.

Did you KNOW?

A Transformative Education

If you, or someone you know, is interested in a different kind of graduate program, who is motivated to learn by doing and is seeking a transformative education, then we need to talk.

TRP Heroes Spotlight: Dr. Chris Klinger

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown us how important frontline healthcare workers are for the normal functioning of our worlds. To support and celebrate these brave hearts, the Translational Research Program launched "TRP Heroes", an initiative to...

The centre provides simulated realistic learning opportunities to prepare students, allied health care professionals, researchers, physicians and surgeons for actual patient care situations that could occur in the emergency/trauma, operating room or inpatient ward environments. It is also an ideal resource for developing educational curriculum and research.

A Transformative Education

At the TRP our goal is not to teach. Our goal is not to lecture or have you memorize some datum likely to change before you finish your degree, or that a search engine can find faster than you can formulate the question.

The TRP is a community and a mindset of people who are resources, facilitators, mentors, peers, guides and catalysts whose aim is to help those, who are looking to learn, to explore, to push the boundaries of their experience to seek knowledge.

The TRP is not intended to be divided as a degree of teacher-task-masters and students–those who know one truth and those hoping to memorize that truth. Instead, the program strives to be a community of people motivated to learn, to seek knowledge, to help others to be more and do more. In this community, the focus is not on the content but on understanding the processes, the mechanisms of creative problem-solving and innovation.

Students learn alongside the faculty–we learn together and from each other. We learn from real-world contexts and from failure–not from arbitrary grades or standardized testing–because our collective goals are not to pass a test or earn a grade but to improve lives, to learn to champion change that will improve the lives of others.

Now, we are starting to seek people join our 2021 cohort. Those motivated to learn, those seeking to move beyond their comfort zones, to challenge ambiguity, who want to focus on the processes of innovating of generating new ideas and championing change for positive impact are the kindred spirits we seek–these are the people we seek to join our ranks.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in a different kind of graduate program, who is motivated to learn by doing and is seeking a transformative education, then we need to talk. Come to an information session, read the website, arrange a consultation with someone from our team.

One day soon, we, trainees, mentors, facilitators, students, residents, PI’s, researchers, clinicians, healthcare professionals, and many others, will form a global network of professional translators, who think globally but work locally to improve the health and well-being of people in our communities. And together we will transform health, care and medicine.

Join us.

TRP Student, shares via @TorontoStar Doctor’s Note her expertise on stroke recognition

It is crucial to know the signs of a stroke and get help right away when symptoms suddenly strike, says University of Toronto’s Dr. Gurpreet Jaswal, MHSc in Translational Research Candidate.

That means calling 911 immediately.

The sooner you get help, the better your outcomes will be, Jaswal writes in this week’s edition of Doctors’ Notes, the Toronto Star’s weekly column created by U of T medical experts.

“As a general internal medicine physician, I see how the passage of time can affect patient outcomes after a stroke,” Jaswal writes. “More often than we’d like, my colleagues and I see people who have waited to get help, or gone to an urgent care or walk-in clinic before coming in to the hospital. They might not have realized they were having a stroke or how serious their symptoms were. The problem is, this delays our ability to help tremendously.”

Jaswal, who is completing her fellowship in the division of general internal medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, writes that the two treatments used for stroke patients need to be administered within specific time frames. The first is tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, a drug for clots that must be administered within 4½ hours of the onset of the stroke.

The other is endovascular treatment, or EVT, which must be done within six hours. That treatment involves using specialized imaging to locate a clot and sending a wire all the way up the arteries through a person’s groin to remove it.

What are the symptoms to look out for? The acronym FAST refers to symptoms in 75 per cent of all strokes – face drooping, arm weakness and speech difficulty (the T is for time to call 911).

But there could be other symptoms, Jaswal writes. “It could be the entire side of your body, or it might only be in one arm, leg or portion of the face. Other symptoms include double vision, numbness or tingling.

“A striking feature of a stroke is that the onset is usually sudden.”

Read the full Doctors’ Notes column

Source: UofT News and The Toronto Star

Dr. Gurpreet Jaswal, MD is an Internal Medicine Physician, Stroke Prevention Enthusiast. She is a candidate for Master of Health Science in Translational Research and is completing her fellowship in the division of General Internal Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.

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